Problems with radiometric dating of rocks lionel messi dating


03-Jan-2017 20:53

Let us critically examine each of these claims and see if they hold up against the science.While doing so, we will have to learn about how radiometric dating works.We note that at the instant the swimmer touches the end of the pool our wristwatch reads and 53 seconds.How long has the competitor taken to swim the race?Most young earth creationists reject all of these points.As a scientific skeptics, we ask ourselves: is this really the case?Thus, if we start out with 1 gram of the parent isotope, after the passage of 1 half-life there will be 0.5 gram of the parent isotope left.After the passage of two half-lives only 0.25 gram will remain, and after 3 half lives only 0.125 will remain etc.

These claims generally land in three different categories: (1) radiometric dating assumes that initial conditions (concentrations of mother and daughter nuclei) are known, (2) radiometric dating assumes that rocks are closed systems and (3) radiometric dating assumes that decay rates are constant.

There are many different kinds of radiometric dating and not all conclusions we will reach can be extrapolated to all methods used.

Also, different radiometric dating techniques independently converges with each other and with other dating techniques such as dendrochronology, layers in sediment, growth rings on corals, rhythmic layering of ice in glaciers, magnetostratigraphy, fission tracks and many other methods. There exists different versions, or isotopes of many elements.

Only rarely does a creationist actually find an incorrect radiometric result (Austin 1996; Rugg and Austin 1998) that has not already been revealed and discussed in the scientific literature.

The creationist approach of focusing on examples where radiometric dating yields incorrect results is a curious one for two reasons.

The energies involved are so large, and the nucleus is so small that physical conditions in the Earth (i.e. The rate of decay or rate of change of the number N of particles is proportional to the number present at any time, i.e.